Many persons sensitive to monosodium glutamate complain also of symptoms including rash and inflammation.  (See also the page on MSG and Rosacea.)  MSG is a nerve cell trigger.   It is an excitatory neurotransmitter">

Many persons sensitive to monosodium glutamate complain also of symptoms including rash and inflammation.  (See also the page on MSG and Rosacea.)  MSG is a nerve cell trigger.   It is an excitatory neurotransmitter, which acts as a chemical messenger to carry a signal from one nerve cell to the next.  Recent research from Johns Hopkins links nervous system overstimulation to the immune response.  Immune response includes the release of histamine and white blood cells.  The  immune response allows the blood vessels to become "leaky" so that the white blood cells can get to the site of the injury.  This flood of fluid leaving the blood vessels and entering the tissue is what we recognize as swelling. 

Many researchers as mentioned recently in such magazines as Scientific American (June 2000) and the New Yorker, are recently concluding that inflammation is related to the damage seen in Alzheimer's disease.  It appears that those following a regimen involving the use of anti-inflammatory supplements and medications are afforded some protection from severe damage to the brain.  The anti-inflammatory information right now focuses on a  few pharmaceutical products which inhibit inflammation.  But, aspirin also has some of these properties.  And so do some simple household spices which have been revered and used for centuries.  These are rosemary, oregano, and ginger.

It would seem that if inflammation would be a risk factor in Alzheimers disease, it may be wise to avoid triggers of inflammation such as MSG.

 

 

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